midnight rambler





sagansense:

This is Frankenstein, MD. The show that’s overflowing with fascinating medical science facts…

So….this show is awesome and yet another brilliant PBS Digital Studios addition. Everyone, I encourage you to watch episodes 1, 2, 3, share them with your friends everyone, and make sure to follow vfrankmd on Tumblr, FrankensteinMD on Twitter,

,
"Like" the Facebook page for continuous updates, and peep the Instagram for more bite-sized frankenfun!

image

Browse the archive here….

And lastly, here’s a preview (below and this link) of Frankenstein MD’s blog post introduction to the series and the first episode, which communicates the fascinating aspect of Galvanism or, “animal electricity”…muahahaha…

image

Hi everyone. I’m very excited to release the first three episodes of Frankenstein, M.D., the web series that challenges assumptions and pushes boundaries in the fields of science and medicine. In our first experiment, my partner Iggy DeLacey and I explore the connection between electricity and the source of life itself.

And I’ve got all the “shocking” puns I need from Iggy, so don’t even start.

Visionary scientists throughout history have experimented with electrical power as a medical tool. One of my favorites is Italian physician Luigi Galvani, who demonstrated in 1786 that he could cause muscular contractions in a dissected frog’s leg by touching its nerve endings to a power source. His research led to an entire field being named after him (Galvanism) and laid the groundwork for the creation of the electrocardiogram, or EKG.

image

The EKG, which Iggy and I use in our experiment, measures the heart’s electrical activity. The device has come a long way since Dutch physiologist Willem Einthoven invented it in 1895, a feat that won him the Nobel Prize. The early models took five people to operate and required the patient to immerse each of their limbs in a container of salt water. Fortunately, we can now measure the heart’s activity (or lack thereof) through electrodes placed on the skin.

Oh, and another term that you’ll need to know for this episode is premature ventricular contractions, or PVCs. They are extra, abnormal heartbeats that begin in one of your heart’s two lower pumping chambers (ventricles) and disrupt your regular heartbeat rhythm. They are very common and nothing to be concerned about – certainly not worth making foolish and potentially life-threatening decisions involving electrical equipment.

image

Share and promote good science!


1 day ago on 20 Aug, 14 | 846 notes via sagansense - © pemberleydigital-
legionofpotatoes:

Ever since seeing Guardians of the Galaxy I’ve been abuzz with drawing something for it. So many favorite moments, characters, scenes. A stunning, funny, touching and meaningful movie.
So here’s a poster.

legionofpotatoes:

Ever since seeing Guardians of the Galaxy I’ve been abuzz with drawing something for it. So many favorite moments, characters, scenes. A stunning, funny, touching and meaningful movie.

So here’s a poster.


sagansense:

ageofdestruction:

alanis: Clouds and shadows on Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 24th May 2012.

Between 28 and 36°S, 284°E, on the arc of highlands that surround the southeast Solis Planum. The crater split between the 2nd and 3rd images is Voeykov, about 75 km across, named for climatologist and geographer Alexander Ivanovich Voeykov (1842-1916). The small, deep crater toward bottom left of the 4th image is Los, named for a village of about 400 people in Gävleborg County, Sweden.

Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and 5 monochrome images for animation. Colour is not balanced naturalistically, and the slightly psychedelic colours of the clouds are a result of mismatches between the images where the clouds have moved between exposures.

Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

You’re looking at another world. Let that sink in. We will be livestreaming in real time soon…


1 day ago on 20 Aug, 14 | 3757 notes via sagansense - © ageofdestruction
leannewoodfull:

basically

leannewoodfull:

basically


1 day ago on 20 Aug, 14 | 158348 notes via the-statuesque - © illkim
tagged as: #haha pretty much
did-you-kno:

A new material called “bone foam” has the potential to fix physical deformities by replacing missing bone pieces and encouraging cells to regrow in its place until it is completely absorbed.
Source

did-you-kno:

A new material called “bone foam” has the potential to fix physical deformities by replacing missing bone pieces and encouraging cells to regrow in its place until it is completely absorbed.

Source


1 day ago on 20 Aug, 14 | 3939 notes via did-you-kno